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Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Means and Ends

I want to talk to you about an idea, a concept - the underlying moral principles that drive ideas. My deep concern about our nation is that there is radical confusion, not just in the population in general, but in the church in particular, about how to do moral thinking. One of the most immediate examples of such a thing is the area of embryonic stem cell research and cloning. You know that Congress is debating right now whether to allow human cloning or not, and whether to allow the cloning of embryonic stem cells for research. Actually those are both the exact same issue.

Article | Bio-Ethics | Greg Koukl | March 10, 2013

Did Morals Evolve?

If the answer is yes, then we are in trouble. I have consistently put forth what I believe to be a very strong argument for the existence of a personal God and the reality of personal guilt before God based on the existence of self-evident moral rules in the universe. I think it's a good argument. But it hasn't gone unchallenged, especially by those who are committed to the belief that nothing truly exists which is not subject to examination by the senses through scientific inquiry.

Article | Philosophy | Greg Koukl | March 10, 2013

Babies As Organ Farms

Greg responds to a "stunning" L.A. Times editorial that states we should harvest the organs of anencephalic babies because it can now be morally justified. I want to read to you an editorial from the June 8 L.A. Times . It's a quite stunning editorial. I have never read anything quite like this. I was surprised that the L.A. Times editorial board took the position a position like this. It is called "An Exception to the Rule," and subtitled, "Parents should be able to donate organs of infants born without brains."

Article | Ethics | Greg Koukl | March 10, 2013

The Upper Story Leap

What's at heart here is not so much science and facts, but a philosophy of doing science which says that you can only talk about things which are scientific and you must remove any reference to a supernatural force whatsoever.

Article | Apologetics | Greg Koukl | March 7, 2013

The Upper Story Leap

What's at heart here is not so much science and facts, but a philosophy of doing science which says that you can only talk about things which are scientific and you must remove any reference to a supernatural force whatsoever.

Article | Apologetics | Greg Koukl | March 7, 2013

Science Doesn't Tell Us Anything Important

There's something very important to you that science didn't discover: your soul.

Article | Apologetics | Greg Koukl | March 7, 2013

Science & Faith: Competition or Integration

If religion tells you how to go to Heaven, and science tells you how the heavens go, but religion can’t be proven, how can it answer the big questions in life?  You need to have some tools to see what’s going on in this book The Grand Design by the esteemed Stephen Hawking, the great mathematician. It is shaking things up—without good reason.

Article | Science | Greg Koukl | March 6, 2013

Atheist Bag of Tricks–Notes for Atheism Debate

Greg Koukl debated Michael Shermer on Hugh Hewitt's radio program.  These are Greg's debate prep notes.  

Article | Apologetics | Greg Koukl | March 1, 2013

Science Isn't, Science Is

Stephen Jay Gould, evolution's popular icon from Harvard, has fired his latest salvo against creation in his new book, Rocks of Ages. He continues to advance the idea that the term "creation science" is an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms. There are even some Christian thinkers who agree with him. Creation, they suggest, is theological. Science is empirical. Religion and science, like oil and water, don't mix. They represent two entirely different "magisteriums," in Gould's words. Science is the domain of fact and reason. Religion is the domain of belief and faith.

Article | Philosophy | Greg Koukl | February 28, 2013

The Upper Story Leap

What's at heart here is not so much science and facts, but a philosophy of doing science which says that you can only talk about things which are scientific and you must remove any reference to a supernatural force whatsoever.

Article | Christianity & Culture | Greg Koukl | February 28, 2013