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The Problem of Good

I read Martin Short’s autobiography this weekend. I’ve had the impression that Short is one of those celebrities who seems like a regular guy; he’s led a pretty normal life despite his celebrity. A family man, married for 30 years. I enjoyed reading the book.

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | November 12, 2014

The Second Story

As I listen to many of the subjects in debate today in our culture - the dialog between secularists and Christians - there's a fundamental difference in perspectives that I think we need to be aware of if we're going to try to be persuasive. Faith and religion have been relegated to the realm of wishful thinking and personal preference. For many we're talking with and in the public discourse, it has nothing to do with reality. Religion is a personal taste, like ice cream, so it's bizarre to them that we're trying to get them to like the same flavor we like.

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | September 18, 2013

The Trinity: Unique, Yet Rational

Is the doctrine of the Trinity an irrational idea? Does it discredit Christianity?

Article | Philosophy | Melinda Penner | April 24, 2013

Are Jesus' Two Natures Compatible?

Are Jesus' human and divine natures compatible? Is this an impossibility that makes Christianity irrational?

Article | Philosophy | Melinda Penner | April 24, 2013

Christianity and Naturalism

James Sire describes naturalists as monistic materialists who deny the existence of immaterial entities and their ability to act in this world.[1] Though naturalism can be characterized in broader term, which I will address briefly later in this paper, Sire's characterization is really of materialism. Ontological or metaphysical naturalism is defined in The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy as the view that everything is composed of natural entities constructed of properties as the sciences allow.

Article | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | February 28, 2013

Oprah's Religion: A Brief Evaluation of Eckhart Tolle's A New Earth

Is Oprah’s religion (ala Eckhart Tolle) compatible with Christianity and the Bible? This brief article isn't an exhaustive analysis of Eckhart Tolle's work but a brief evaluation of that question. This question has been brought to STR a number of times. Oprah claims the answer is yes. And surprisingly, more than a few Christians think the answer is yes. But even a cursory reading of Tolle makes it obvious the answer can only be no, and that he is actually teaching Hinduism, not Christianity.

Article | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | February 28, 2013

Do Extraordinary Claims Demand Extraordinary Evidence?

Hume offered this challenge in "Of Miracles" in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.

Article | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | February 21, 2013

Logic, God, and Humans

"Is God subject to human knowledge?" is the way the question usually goes. It's actually backwards. "Is man subject to God's logic?"  Yes.  Logic is an objective, necessary feature of the universe, of minds. It's not a contingent fact of this created world.  It's the way human minds function because we're created in God's image and it's the way His mind functions.  So God isn't subject to human logic. Humans are subject to God's logic.

Blog Post | Philosophy | Melinda Penner | February 3, 2013

Can Naturalists Know Anything?

Scott Smith, from Biola, has written an important book you may never read, but the ideas are very important in understanding the debate over reason between atheists and theists.  There's a fatal flaw in atheism's worldview that undercuts their claim to know reality.

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | August 15, 2012

All Brain, No Mind

I've been watching a new TV show, Perception, on TNT.  It's the latest variation of one of my all-time favorties, Monk, where the main character's disability gives him a unique edge in solving crime.  The character Dr. Daniel Pierce is an accomplished professor of neuroscience who struggles with schizophrenia himself.  And he makes a mistake that expresses a logical fallacy common in science today.

Blog Post | Philosophy | Melinda Penner | August 8, 2012