I’m an Ancient Christian

As I continue to read and learn about the Emerging Church, there’s a question that keeps running through my mind:  Why do I have to reject classical Christianity to embrace more significant worship, a more authentic Christian life, and a deeper relationship with God? The church has practiced these things for 2000  years.

But some in the Emerging Movement, including Robert Webber, author of Ancient-Future Faith, has said that in order to embrace those values he rejected the existence of propositions, the classical view of truth, and foundationalism all philosophical distinctions.

I don't because these philosophical views give me an adequate way to ground the Biblical view of truth.  I'm not defending everything in these philosophical perspectives.  But many emergent proponents are encouraging us to abandon philosophies that can ground objective truth in order to solve problems in the church.  But some of the most faithful, authentic, properly-pious Christians I've ever known are philosophers who ground the truth of Christianity using these philosophical notions.  These are not incompatible with a vibrant Christian life.

I'm an ancient Christian.  I confess and love the ancient creeds because they express truth about God and love for knowledge of Him.  And they are carefully and rigorously formulated in propositions that carry eternal meaning for us to understand God better in order to have a deeper relationship with Him.  You see, it's not as if new rules of thinking were thought up in the 18th century enlightenment; these philosophies are simply attempts to accurately reflect on how God has made our minds and the world to work.  Even the ancients saw this.  It seems to me that the church has the resources in our history to solve the problems without a radical overhaul in how we understand truth.

Melinda Penner

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