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A Reverent Scientist

William Thomson, Lord Kelvin, helped lay the foundation for modern physics. He was also a mathematician, engineer, and inventor. His most significant work was developing the laws of thermodynamics with James Joule. He invented submarine telegraphy and worked on the project laying the trans-Atlantic telegraph line. He was the first scientist to be honored with a peerage and received 21 honorary degrees. His work "portended the relativity theory and quantum theory."

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | June 5, 2014

George Cuvier – Zoologist, Biologist, and Christian

George Cuvier launched modern vertebrate paleontology. He originated the major classification of living things based on the nervous system: Vertebrata, Articulata, Mollusca, and Radiata. He also proved persuasively that animals did go extinct, which was doubted at the time. He was a Christian who believed God had created the world with all the variety of living things and that all modern species descended from their original pairs.

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | May 29, 2014

Father of Modern Taxonomy

You've seen plants referred to by their scientific names, such as Rosa rubiginosa. That form of naming plants and other living things was introduced by a Christian who was a scientist named Carolus Linnaeus. He was born in Sweden in 1707 to a Lutheran pastor. He showed interest in nature from his childhood, and eventually pursued science at the University of Uppsala.

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | May 22, 2014

Science, Purpose, and Design

William Harvey was a physician and scientist in the 16th and 17th centuries who was the first to demonstrate how the circulatory system worked. He described how the arteries, veins, valves, lungs, and heart worked to circulate blood – and he was amazed at God's design and purpose in the systems of the body. He enjoyed studying how God had made things to work.

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | May 15, 2014

Literature and the Gospels' Genre

C.S. Lewis is well known for being an apologist and writer. But first, he was a literature scholar. His remarks about claims that the Gospels were legend draws from his experience. He wrote this essay in 1959, and the original title was "Modern Theology and Biblical Criticism." It is still a quite timely and apt observation on the current Biblical critics:

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | May 14, 2014

Science, a Worthy Christian Vocation

"For some, the wonder may be that a monk contributed anything at all to science. Don't people in monasteries spend all their time praying, singing, and fighting off dirty thoughts? Not so the friars of the St.

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | May 8, 2014

Lord, Liar, Lunatic...or Legend?

The first time I heard C.S. Lewis' Trilemma challenged was nearly 20 years ago. A local college professor invited Greg to speak to his philosophy class each term. The professor was a skeptic, but was happy to expose his students to good thinking even if he didn't believe what the Bible taught about Jesus. After one class period, he chatted with Greg and presented his challenge to the Trilemma. It was incomplete, he said. There is a fourth possibility: The Gospels are legends.

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | May 7, 2014

Copernicus and the Scientific Revolution

It's funny that many secularists believe that Christian myths about Jesus evolved over time until they were written down generations later. This is the thesis in Bart Ehrman's latest book. It's not accurate. It's funny because there are things believed by some of the same secularists that actually are myths that evolved over time to create the impression that Christianity is a science stopper and anti-intellectual.

Blog Post | Apologetics | Melinda Penner | May 1, 2014

Unparallels

Denny Burk makes a careful and important point why the NBA/Sterling case is not like the Mozilla/Eich case. While the concerns for precedents being set and used illegitimately in the future are a valid concern, we still need to make careful distinctions when there are relevant differences. Burk quotes Andrew Sullivan on how actually saying and doing racist things is quite different than holding principled views and supporting them politically. 

Blog Post | Christianity & Culture | Melinda Penner | April 30, 2014

Gifts, Talents, and Character

One of the resources I like best in Logos Bible Software is the library of Timothy Keller's sermons from over 20 years at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City. I've been listening to sermons by Keller for a couple of years now, so when I saw they were releasing transcriptions, I was anxious to get them so that I could also read them.

Blog Post | Miscellaneous | Melinda Penner | April 29, 2014